LECOM students and community recognize National Osteopathic Medicine Week

The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Millcreek Community Hospital, Medical Associates of Erie and the Erie, Greensburg and Bradenton communities joined together during the week of April 15 to 21, 2012, to recognize the commitment and professionalism of the nation’s osteopathic physicians during National Osteopathic Medicine Week.

The event, which is promoted each year by the American Osteopathic Association, brings the osteopathic medical profession together to focus on one common goal: increasing awareness of osteopathic medicine and Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.s) in communities across the country. It is held each year to coincide with the founding date of the AOA, which is April 19, 1897.
 
As part of the local recognition, Erie Mayor Joseph Sinnott presented an official proclamation at the LECOM campus on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 to Silvia Ferretti, DO, LECOM Provost, Senior Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs, and representatives from LECOM’s Student Government Association (SGA). The proclamation recognizes the contributions of osteopathic physicians in the Erie area and their dedication “to improving the health of their community through education and awareness-based efforts, as well as by delivering quality health services.”
 
Bradenton Mayor Wayne H. Poston issued a similar NOM Week proclamation to LECOM Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Robert George, DO and to members of the SGA.
 
To conclude National Osteopathic Medicine Week, medical and pharmacy students in Erie held their annual LECOM Health and Wellness Fair for the Erie community at the Millcreek Mall on Sunday, April 22, 2012 from 11am-3pm.
 
 
Angela Virgilio (OMS1) takes the blood pressure of one of the many visitors to the blood pressure screening table during the wellness fair.   Josephine Shen (OMS1) describes the OMM techniques that Eric Krohn (OMS1) is performing on Joanna Aiken (OMS1).
 
More than 70 students representing 15 different clubs and organizations, provided handouts and information on various health-related topics.  Some of the topics are women’s health, travel safety, heart health, skin safety, osteopathic medicine, poison prevention, free blood pressure screenings and so much more.

National Osteopathic Medicine (NOM) Week was April 15-21. NOM Week helped bring the osteopathic medical profession together to focus on one common goal — increasing awareness of osteopathic medicine and DOs in communities across the country. 

 
City of Bradenton Mayor Wayne H. Poston (fifth from left), proclaimed National Osteopathic Medicine Week with LECOM Associate Dean of Academic Affairs Robert George, DO (center) and LECOM medical students Anthony Dominick, Katherine Lambert, Kimberly Feltner, Kelly Rosborough and Alan Mashraghi.   City of Erie Mayor Joseph Sinnot (right) presented a proclamation for National Osteopathic Medicine Week to Michael Pham, OMS1 (left) and Kristi Braunlich, OMS1 (center).

 
What is a DO?
Osteopathic physicians (DOs) are fully licensed to prescribe medication and practice in all specialty areas, including family practice, surgery and psychiatry. Currently, there are more than 78,000 DOs and 19,000 osteopathic medical students in the United States. DOs are trained to consider the health of the whole person and use their hands to help diagnose and treat their patients. They focus on preventive health care by teaching their patients to develop attitudes and lifestyles that don’t just fight illness but also help prevent it.

The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine offers innovative and affordable education in osteopathic medicine, dentistry and pharmacy. From campuses in Erie, Pennsylvania, Greensburg, Pennsylvania and Bradenton, Florida, LECOM believes that when mind, body and spirit come together the impossible becomes suddenly possible. It is a calling each and every one of our students embodies to become the best they can be. To prevent disease and treat it. To give hope. Can you hear the calling?
 
April 13, 2012
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